joespub:

Toshi Reagon and Big Lovely with special guests Nona Hendryx and live drawings by Michael Arthur. January 24, 2013. Photography by Kevin Yatarola. More photos here, at Kevin’s site.

The Objex – “Retribution”

“No one’s ever going to speak for you. True Freedom is not given to you. This life is a fight each and every day. Who really knows what’s right for you. Some motherfucker living on top of a hill? He’s never lived your life for just one day. He’s going to tell you what’s right, turn his back and pick a fight. Cause some corruption; Get your retribution.“

For Objex lead singer Melanie Troxler, the future of punk is bright

For Objex lead singer Melanie Troxler, the future of punk is bright

Felony Melony: I’m here to start a revolution—a whole new rock revolution. I feel like Tina Turner, she did her thing and she’s still doing her thing and I look up to her a lot. I love her. She’s not punk, but she is rock n’ roll and rock n’ roll is forever. She’s been an inspiration to me my whole life, so I want to be the person to come out and break the mold. [Read More]

Afropunk BOTB Atlanta (2015)

This is now walking distance from where I live, so I will be here! If you’re in Atlanta, come out! Tickets are still on sale and are just five bucks.

Tickets from Eventbrite: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/afropunk-battle-of-the-bands-atl-tickets-17249592997

Basement ATL: http://basementatl.com/afropunk-battle-of-the-bands-atl/

Apollo Heights

dmc-dmc:

blackrockandrollmusic:

Apollo Heights: White Music For Black People

There may be several notable Black rock bands most don’t know about, but the debut album from Apollo Heights, White Music For Black People
(released on the Minimal Vinyl label), beckons for your attention. (If
you are old enough, you might be familiar with rocker Screamin’ Jay
Hawkins’ Black Music For White People album, which featured the 1956 hit
“I Put A Spell On You.” The song was included in The Rock and Roll Hall
of Fame’s “500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.”)

Danny Chavis
points out that EBONY in the 1960s was the first major publication to
introduce Jimi Hendrix to the world, in addition to introducing other
Black artists who pioneered the sound of rock. Though Hendrix’s
legendary imprint will never fade, Black rock bands still find it hard
to get a record deal, or even get noticed.

The real deal,
according to Honeychild: “They feel threatened that you’re doing ‘the
thing’ that contradicts their concept of what you ‘should be doing.’
People get really uptight about what their concept of ‘Black music’ is
… because our music is so different. Here, as Black people playing
alternative music, everyone’s like, ‘You can’t do that,’ and in Europe
it’s like, ‘Oh, wow, what are you gonna do?!’ It’s completely the other
side of the coin.”

None of those people making those comments have no idea where this genre of music came from if they’re so flabbergasted by this -___-

So true! Growing up, I was completely ignorant of where rock actually came from, and a lot of people made me feel like I had no place being into the music so much. It was an epiphany to discover that rock came out of blues and thus from the culture and experiences of African-Americans. We are really just reclaiming what’s ours, and our place has ALWAYS been here. The world just needs to be reminded of that, unfortunately.

Apollo Heights: White Music For Black People

blackrockandrollmusic:

Apollo Heights: White Music For Black People

There may be several notable Black rock bands most don’t know about, but the debut album from Apollo Heights, White Music For Black People
(released on the Minimal Vinyl label), beckons for your attention. (If
you are old enough, you might be familiar with rocker Screamin’ Jay
Hawkins’ Black Music For White People album, which featured the 1956 hit
“I Put A Spell On You.” The song was included in The Rock and Roll Hall
of Fame’s “500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.”)

Danny Chavis
points out that EBONY in the 1960s was the first major publication to
introduce Jimi Hendrix to the world, in addition to introducing other
Black artists who pioneered the sound of rock. Though Hendrix’s
legendary imprint will never fade, Black rock bands still find it hard
to get a record deal, or even get noticed.

The real deal,
according to Honeychild: “They feel threatened that you’re doing ‘the
thing’ that contradicts their concept of what you ‘should be doing.’
People get really uptight about what their concept of ‘Black music’ is
… because our music is so different. Here, as Black people playing
alternative music, everyone’s like, ‘You can’t do that,’ and in Europe
it’s like, ‘Oh, wow, what are you gonna do?!’ It’s completely the other
side of the coin.”

Afro-Punk Scene, Inspired By Santogold, TV On The Radio And More, Explodes Into A Multi-Genre Movement

Afro-Punk Scene, Inspired By Santogold, TV On The Radio And More, Explodes Into A Multi-Genre Movement