Erzulie – “Suffer”

If you like that Plasmatics-type punk/metal sound, then you will love Erzulie.

Hailing from Chicago and featuring GoldGrrl as their frontwoman, Erzulie has that dirty, gritty sound that makes listening to metal fun (at least for me!).

If you’re in the mood for something witchy, then go on over to Bandcamp and check out The Black Blood: Genesis EP. You can preview the single “Suffer” below.

Shout, Sister, Shout!: The Untold Story of Rock-And-Roll Trailblazer Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Long before “women in rock” became a media catchphrase, African American guitar virtuoso Rosetta Tharpe proved in spectacular fashion that women could rock. Born in Cotton Plant, Arkansas, in 1915, Tharpe was gospel’s first superstar and the preeminent crossover figure of its golden age (1945-1965).

“Shout, Sister, Shout ” is the first biography of this trailblazing performer who influenced scores of popular musicians, from Elvis Presley and Little Richard to Eric Clapton and Etta James. Tharpe was raised in the Pentecostal Church, steeped in the gospel tradition, but she produced music that crossed boundaries, defied classification, and disregarded the social and cultural norms of the age; incorporating elements of gospel, blues, jazz, popular ballads, folk, country, rhythm and blues, and rock and roll. Tharpe went electric early on, captivating both white and black audiences in the North and South, in the U.S. and internationally, with her charisma and skill. People who saw her perform claimed she made that guitar talk. Ambitious, flamboyant, and relentlessly public, Tharpe even staged her own wedding as a gospel concert-in a stadium holding 20,000 people.

Wald’s eye-opening biography, which draws on the memories of more than a hundred people who knew or worked with Tharpe, introduces us to this vibrant, essential, yet nearly forgotten musical heavyweight whose long career helped define gospel, r&b, and rock music. A performer who resisted categorization at many levels-as a gospel musician, a woman, and an African American-Tharpe demands that we rethink our most basic notions of music history and American culture. Her story forever alters our understanding of both women in rock and U.S. popular music.

Source: Shout, Sister, Shout!: The Untold Story of Rock-And-Roll Trailblazer Sister Rosetta Tharpe (Paperback) | Charis Books & More and Charis Circle

Woman with Guitar: Memphis Minnie’s Blues

Universally recognized as one of the greatest blues artists, Memphis Minnie (1897-1973) wrote and recorded hundreds of songs. Blues people as diverse as Muddy Waters, Johnny Shines, Big Mama Thornton, and Chuck Berry have acknowledged her as a major influence. At a time when most female vocalists sang Tin Pan Alley material, Minnie wrote her own lyrics and accompanied her singing with virtuoso guitar playing. Thanks to her merciless imagination and dark humor, her songs rank among the most vigorous and challenging popular poetry in any language.

“Woman with Guitar” is the first full-length study of the life and work of this extraordinary free spirit, focusing on the lively interplay between Minnie’s evolving artistry and the African American community in which she lived and worked. Drawing on folklore, psychoanalysis, critical theory, women’s studies, and surrealism, the authors’ explorations of Minnie’s songs illuminate the poetics of popular culture as well as the largely hidden history of working-class women’s self-emancipation.

(via Woman with Guitar: Memphis Minnie’s Blues (Paperback) | Charis Books & More and Charis Circle)

Nona Hendryx on black women & rock music

fuckyeahlabelle-blog:
From an Interview w/BRM:

In terms of what you were [just] saying…  it’s not that easy for black women to be accepted doing hard rock. I was wondering how it was for you thirty years ago when you were doing that. Did you run up against any obstacles at the time?

“Many obstacles and the obstacles were on both sides of the street, the white side of the street, in terms of, this is not your music, which I felt was not true because I’m from Chuck Berry and Little Richard. Rock comes from there. And from the black side, well, you know, you were more acceptable if you were doing R&B or funk, but even funk was not acceptable. R&B was more acceptable. I did get that from the business side, not from the audience. That’s where you had these categories that you’re supposed to fit into, and if you don’t, then they don’t know what to do with you.”