Black History Month: Barbara Lynn

Barbara Lynn (born January 16, 1942 in Beaumont, TX) is a left-guitarist, songwriter and vocalist best known for the song “You’ll Lose a Good Thing“, which was recorded and released in 1962. The single was a number 1 on the US Billboard R&B Charts, as well as a Top 10 single in the Billboard Hot 100 list of 1962. The song was re-recorded by Aretha Franklin, as well as country musician Freddy Fender. Barbara Lynn played piano as a child, but later switched to guitar. Before making her big break she played in an all-female band called Bobbie Lynn and Her Idols. She was given a Pioneer Award by the Rhythm and Blues foundation in 1999. (Wikipedia)

Mixtape Alert | History of Black Female Guitarists | Don’t Dance Her Down Boys

Sometimes I forget that some people don’t know the full impact that black women had on rock n roll. If you didn’t know it was epic. Without the talent and energy of many wonderful women the state of music today would be blander than Cliff Richard eating a cucumber sandwich.

Read More: Mixtape Alert | History of Black Female Guitarists | Don’t Dance Her Down Boys

Sister Rosetta Tharpe: Early Influencer award to be given by Rock and Roll HOF

From Rolling Stone:

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has officially announced next year’s inductees: Bon Jovi, Dire Straits, the Moody Blues, the Cars and Nina Simone will all join the class of 2018. Sister Rosetta Tharpe will be given an Early Influence award.

Nina Simone died in 2003 and Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who has experienced a huge resurgence of interest in the past decade, died in 1973. The Hall of Fame is likely to bring in artists they inspired to perform their music.

 

Review: Tetrarch’s “Freak” LP – Very dark, very heavy.

I finally got my hands on Tetrarch’s new LP Freak, which is a fail on my part because I didn’t realize the whole album was out already! I’ve been waiting for what felt like 84 years for new music from this band, and this thing has been out nearly two full months and I didn’t even realize it.

Freak is a full album, which already makes it wonderful in my eyes. The only thing that sucked about Relentless was that it was too short. Relentless had more of a hard driving, onwards to battle metal sound, but Freak takes a chilled out, nü-metal direction. A couple of songs harken back to Tetrarch’s previous sound (“Oddity” and “Break The Trend”) but most of the album has a KoRn/Slipknot sort of feel to it.

It’s a different sound, and Tetrarch does it well. I highly recommend checking this album out if you’re into metal or hard rock music. The album can be purchased from iTunes and Amazon Music, and can also be streamed on Spotify. Tetrarch is on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, so show them love!

On the legacy of Sister Rosetta Tharpe (repost)

“Whenever a rock musician lets loose a glorious guitar solo, we’re in the living presence of Rosetta, who made a habit of playing as loud as she could, based on the Pentecostal belief that the Lord smiled on those who made a joyful noise.”

— Gayle F Wald, Shout, Sister, Shout!: The Untold Story of Rock-N-Roll Trailblazer Sister Rosetta Tharpe (p.216)

Vote for Sister Rosetta Tharpe to be inducted into the Rock Hall of Fame here. Votes can be cast once a day, and the voting period ends on December 5th.

Sister Rosetta Tharpe: Nominated for Rock Hall of Fame

From the Arkansas Times article by Stephanie Smittle:

Less than a week after a sign was unveiled in Cotton Plant to honor the rock pioneer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe became a first-time nominee for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. For fans of Tharpe’s, the accolades are obnoxiously overdue; not only is Sister Rosetta part of rock and roll’s complex story, but there’s good reason to argue that she’s the very inventor of the genre.

Out of the 19 nominees for the 2018 induction process, Sister Rosetta’s eligibility is the oldest; artists become eligible for induction 25 years after the release of their first record.

The induction process, a combination of public votes and ballots from music historians, goes like this, as stated on rockhall.com:

Each year, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Foundation’s nominating committee selects the group of artists nominated in the performer category. Ballots are then sent to more than 900 historians, members of the music industry and artists—including every living Rock Hall inductee—and the five performers receiving the most votes become that year’s induction class. Beginning in 2012, fans were given the chance to vote for the nominees they’d like to see inducted into the Rock Hall. The top five vote-getters in the public poll form one ballot, which is weighted the same as the rest of the submitted ballots.

That means you can weigh in if you’re so inclined, throwing your clicks behind five nominees in the fan vote here from now until 11:59 EST, Tuesday, December 5. That same month, inductees will be announced, and the induction ceremony will take place in Cleveland, Ohio on April 14, 2018.

Black Women In Punk: Part 4

 

Photo Credits: Honeychild Coleman (Photo by Ed Marshall Photography NYC), Kathy Foster (Not sure, but if this is yours please let me know!), Shingai Shoniwa (Photo by BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images), Tracy Wormworth (Not sure, but if this is yours please let me know!

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This is the last part of a four part series exploring Black Women who are in punk bands. Last but not least to be featured are the following talented ladies.

Honeychild Coleman (top left): From Kentucky, Honeychild Coleman’s influence has extended across various well-known bands, including “The Slits, Greg Tate’s Burnt Sugar Arkestra , Mad Professor, Apollo Heights , Death Comet Crew (with Rammellzee), Gregor Asche AKA DJ Olive and Raz Mesinai’s Badawi” (1). Besides being a solo artist, she also plays guitar. Her music was featured in the groundbreaking film Pariah. Suggested Song: Echelon (Live) (WebsiteFacebookTwitter)

Kathy Foster (top right): Kathy Foster is best known as the bassist for punk band The Thermals, and plays drums for All Girl Summer Fun Band as well. She is original from California, but moved to Portland, Oregan around 1998. Suggested Song: A Pillar of Salt (Live) (Kathy Foster Wikipedia)

Shingai Shoniwa (bottom left): Shingai Shoniwa is associated with post-punk band the Noisettes, where she plays bass and provides leading vocals. According to Wikipedia, her first name means “be bold/courageous/strong” in the Shona language, which is a Bantu language native to the Shona people of Zimbabwe. Shingai met future Noisettes bandmate Dan Smith at the BRIT School for Performing Arts & Technology (located in Croydon), which she attended. The Noisettes have reached critical acclaim, having been praised by Rolling Stone, the New Yorker, and others. Suggested Song: Never Forget You (Live) (WikipediaInstagram)

Tracy Wormworth (bottom right): Tracy Wormworth comes from a family of musicians — her brother Jimmy Wormworth is a drummer for The Conan O’Brien show, and her father and sister are also musicians (a jazz drummer and vocalist, respectively). Tracy herself plays bass guitar, currently as a member of the B-52s, but originally as a member of new wave band The Waitresses. She has toured with many well-known acts besides the B-52s, including Cyndi Lauper, Sting, and Phyllis Hyman amongst many others. Suggested Song: Christmas Wrapping (Wikipedia)

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If you missed the other parts of the Punk series, they are here: Part 1Part 2Part 3

Check out the Black Women in Metal Series as well: Part 1 Part 2Part 3Part 4

Black Women In Punk: Part 3

Osa Atoe is a punk powerhouse and multi-instrumentalist who has been featured in several bands. Osa is also behind the Black Punk centered zine Shotgun Seamstress. Bands she’s played in include New Bloods (along with Adee Roberson – another black artist), Firebrand, and Negation. Suggested Music: Firebrand – EP (2011)

Ally Lowe is the lead singer of Texas punk band The Atomic Tanlines. With her growling, power house vocals, Ally calls to mind great punk singers like Lux Interior from The Cramps, or Kathleen Hanna from Bikini Kill/Le Tigre. Punk’s not dead, and you’ll believe it after taking a listen at this band. Suggested Song: Dirty Queer Rocknroll (BandcampFacebook)

Rachel Aggs, the lead singer and guitarist of bluesy rock band Trash Kit hails from London. Trash Kit’s music evokes the mood and sounds of the early 1980s post-punk wave (think Public Image Ltd), with a shot of the blues. Suggested Song: Medicine (Facebook)

Joy Vay fronts and plays guitar for NJ based punk band TV Tramps. Anyone who’s a fan of the classic skate punk/pop punk sound will thoroughly enjoy this band. They play fast and hard! Suggested Song: Keep Your Mouth Shut (BandcampFacebook)

Lynette Vertilus is the lead singer for hardcore/powerviolence band Venkman. Check them out if you’re into stomp your face in style hardcore punk — you won’t be disappointed. Suggested Song: Dead End Job (BandcampFacebook)

Kayla Phillips is the lead singer for powerviolence band Bleed The Pigs. Brutal, bold and in your face, Kayla will instantly melt your face with her vocals, and who doesn’t like that? Suggested Song: White Washed (TumblrBandcampFacebook)

Felony Melony, one of the first Black Women rockers I’d ever heard about, is the lead vocalist for Las Vegas, NV punk band The Objex. A former Suicide Girl (which, if you have to ask who they are, you’re too young) and an all around bad ass, Felony Melony and her band once performed in front of a faction of the Aryan Brotherhood. Her band’s another one to get into if you like the skate punk/pop punk sound. Suggested Song: Kill Your Stereotypes (BandcampFacebook)

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This post is part of a series exploring Black Women in Punk music. Part 1 is here, and Part 2 is here. Part 4 is next!

I had this post on ice for awhile, so I no longer have the photo credits for these images. If one of them is yours and you wish to be credited, please comment here or email jaleesa@blackwomeninrock.info.