Black History Month: Barbara Lynn

Barbara Lynn (born January 16, 1942 in Beaumont, TX) is a left-guitarist, songwriter and vocalist best known for the song “You’ll Lose a Good Thing“, which was recorded and released in 1962. The single was a number 1 on the US Billboard R&B Charts, as well as a Top 10 single in the Billboard Hot 100 list of 1962. The song was re-recorded by Aretha Franklin, as well as country musician Freddy Fender. Barbara Lynn played piano as a child, but later switched to guitar. Before making her big break she played in an all-female band called Bobbie Lynn and Her Idols. She was given a Pioneer Award by the Rhythm and Blues foundation in 1999. (Wikipedia)

Mixtape Alert | History of Black Female Guitarists | Don’t Dance Her Down Boys

Sometimes I forget that some people don’t know the full impact that black women had on rock n roll. If you didn’t know it was epic. Without the talent and energy of many wonderful women the state of music today would be blander than Cliff Richard eating a cucumber sandwich.

Read More: Mixtape Alert | History of Black Female Guitarists | Don’t Dance Her Down Boys

Barbara Lynn, the Female Jimi Hendrix?

Barbara Lynn, the Female Jimi Hendrix?

Barbara Lynn

abelson:

if barbara lynn’s this is the thanks i get faced head-to-head in a thanksgiving competition against sly & the family stone’s thank you for talking to me africa and also big star’s thank you friends, the talking heads’ thank you for sending me an angel, also maybe charles mingus’s wham bam thank you ma’am!, and thank you for your love too, who would win?

Barbara Lynn


nprfreshair:

Barbara Lynn wrote her own material, played stinging left-handed guitar, and recorded scores of wonderful records for a number of labels. With the re-release of some of her prime material by Real Gone Music, we have a look in to a vital part of her career. Rock historian Ed Ward has the story today:

“The 25 tracks on this compilation of Barbara Lynn’s Atlantic sides show a woman at the peak of her powers, as a songwriter and interpreter, but somehow Atlantic wasn’t able to push her over the top.”

At The Peak Of Her Powers: Barbara Lynn’s ‘Complete Atlantic Recordings’

Black Girls Rock: The Stage

blackrockandrollmusic:

Black Girls Rock: The Stage

Toshi Reagon
Minnie Riperton
Joi
Ruth Brown
Danielia Cotton
Felony Melony
Barbara Lynn
Dionne Farris
Alexis Brown
Res