Black History Month: Joyce Kennedy

Joyce Kennedy (born 1948 in Anguilla, MS) is one of the lead vocalists for funk rock band Mother’s Finest. Joyce began her singing career after moving to Chicago as a child, and recorded the song “Darling I Still Love You” for Ran-Dee Records. She formed Mother’s Finest in the early 1970s with Glenn Murdock, whom she also married. The band saw three albums go gold: Mother’s Finest, Another Mother Further, and Mother Factor.

Mother’s Finest were the opening act for bands such as Black Sabbath, AC/DC, Aerosmith, and The Who. Their songs and albums have explored a variety of social issues, including the seeming conundrum of being (mostly) black rock and roll artists with songs such as “Niggizz Can’t Sing Rock and Roll” and the album Black Radio Won’t Play This Record.

Joyce also has a solo career, reaching number 2 on the Billboard R&B Charts and number 40 on the Billboard Hot 100 with the song “The Last Time I Made Love” (duet with Jeffrey Osbourne). She toured for the last time with Mother’s Finest in 2017.

See More: Wikipedia, Mother’s Finest Discography

Mother’s Finest to be honored: Atlanta band to be inducted into Georgia Music Hall of Fame

Mother’s Finest to be honored: Atlanta band to be inducted into Georgia Music Hall of Fame
blackrockandrollmusic:

8tracks #BlackWomenInRock playlist

blackwomeninrock:

Check out this playlist on @8tracks: Black Women In Rock playlist (blackwomeninrock.info) by jaleesa-l.

New songs added! This playlist is sourced from my own personal collection, so I can basically only add songs I’ve bought lol. Check it out!

Shea Rose and Joyce Kennedy

divalocity:

Two of my favorites…Shea Rose and the legendary Joyce Kennedy. Rock on ladies!

Joyce Kennedy

thelivingsociety:

One of my all time heroes, Ms. Baby Jean.

Lead Singer of US Funk Rock Super Group MOTHERS FINEST.

(via Mothers Finest « Unsung Heroes)

Black Women In Rock: If Sister Rosetta Tharpe is too old school for you, then maybe Santigold flips your wig. Either way, sisters have been part of rock music for as long as guitar feedback’s been loud

Forget what it sounds like for a minute, let’s consider the spirit of rock and roll: Rebellious. Energetic. Vocal. Independent. Driven. Unapologetic. Powerful. They’re characteristics I could attribute to damn-near every sister I know.
In fact, my personal Who’s Who of Rock and Roll is stacked with bomb Black women. Betty Davis. Grace Jones. Tina Turner. Aretha Franklin. Nona Hendryx. Poly Styrene. Joan Armatrading. Joyce Kennedy… and that’s just 1976-77.
So why do so many people go out of their way to marginalize or flat-out disregard Black women as both pioneers and torchbearers of rock? Why are we so indifferent to the fact that more than a few African-American women strapped an instrument to their back and helped carry the genre from the fields to the church to the juke joint to the charts to a multimillion-dollar industry?
Probably because someone told us it wasn’t ours and we chose to believe it. They said it was devil’s music, so we cast it out. We let it go because someone gave it white skin, a penis, and the green light to cross boundaries that Black people couldn’t. And in so doing, they convinced the world that our pioneers didn’t deserve equal recognition, equal exposure or equal ownership.
Damn shame.