On the legacy of Sister Rosetta Tharpe (repost)

“Whenever a rock musician lets loose a glorious guitar solo, we’re in the living presence of Rosetta, who made a habit of playing as loud as she could, based on the Pentecostal belief that the Lord smiled on those who made a joyful noise.”

— Gayle F Wald, Shout, Sister, Shout!: The Untold Story of Rock-N-Roll Trailblazer Sister Rosetta Tharpe (p.216)

Vote for Sister Rosetta Tharpe to be inducted into the Rock Hall of Fame here. Votes can be cast once a day, and the voting period ends on December 5th.

Sister Rosetta Tharpe: Nominated for Rock Hall of Fame

From the Arkansas Times article by Stephanie Smittle:

Less than a week after a sign was unveiled in Cotton Plant to honor the rock pioneer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe became a first-time nominee for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. For fans of Tharpe’s, the accolades are obnoxiously overdue; not only is Sister Rosetta part of rock and roll’s complex story, but there’s good reason to argue that she’s the very inventor of the genre.

Out of the 19 nominees for the 2018 induction process, Sister Rosetta’s eligibility is the oldest; artists become eligible for induction 25 years after the release of their first record.

The induction process, a combination of public votes and ballots from music historians, goes like this, as stated on rockhall.com:

Each year, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Foundation’s nominating committee selects the group of artists nominated in the performer category. Ballots are then sent to more than 900 historians, members of the music industry and artists—including every living Rock Hall inductee—and the five performers receiving the most votes become that year’s induction class. Beginning in 2012, fans were given the chance to vote for the nominees they’d like to see inducted into the Rock Hall. The top five vote-getters in the public poll form one ballot, which is weighted the same as the rest of the submitted ballots.

That means you can weigh in if you’re so inclined, throwing your clicks behind five nominees in the fan vote here from now until 11:59 EST, Tuesday, December 5. That same month, inductees will be announced, and the induction ceremony will take place in Cleveland, Ohio on April 14, 2018.

Shout, Sister, Shout!: The Untold Story of Rock-And-Roll Trailblazer Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Long before “women in rock” became a media catchphrase, African American guitar virtuoso Rosetta Tharpe proved in spectacular fashion that women could rock. Born in Cotton Plant, Arkansas, in 1915, Tharpe was gospel’s first superstar and the preeminent crossover figure of its golden age (1945-1965).

“Shout, Sister, Shout ” is the first biography of this trailblazing performer who influenced scores of popular musicians, from Elvis Presley and Little Richard to Eric Clapton and Etta James. Tharpe was raised in the Pentecostal Church, steeped in the gospel tradition, but she produced music that crossed boundaries, defied classification, and disregarded the social and cultural norms of the age; incorporating elements of gospel, blues, jazz, popular ballads, folk, country, rhythm and blues, and rock and roll. Tharpe went electric early on, captivating both white and black audiences in the North and South, in the U.S. and internationally, with her charisma and skill. People who saw her perform claimed she made that guitar talk. Ambitious, flamboyant, and relentlessly public, Tharpe even staged her own wedding as a gospel concert-in a stadium holding 20,000 people.

Wald’s eye-opening biography, which draws on the memories of more than a hundred people who knew or worked with Tharpe, introduces us to this vibrant, essential, yet nearly forgotten musical heavyweight whose long career helped define gospel, r&b, and rock music. A performer who resisted categorization at many levels-as a gospel musician, a woman, and an African American-Tharpe demands that we rethink our most basic notions of music history and American culture. Her story forever alters our understanding of both women in rock and U.S. popular music.

Source: Shout, Sister, Shout!: The Untold Story of Rock-And-Roll Trailblazer Sister Rosetta Tharpe (Paperback) | Charis Books & More and Charis Circle

Memphis Minnie – Biography by Barry Lee Pearson

“Tracking down the ultimate woman blues guitar hero is problematic because woman blues singers seldom recorded as guitar players and woman guitar players (such as Rosetta Tharpe and Sister O.M. Terrell) were seldom recorded playing blues. Excluding contemporary artists, the most notable exception to this pattern was Memphis Minnie. The most popular and prolific blueswoman outside the vaudeville tradition, she earned the respect of critics, the support of record-buying fans, and the unqualified praise of the blues artists she worked with throughout her long career. Despite her Southern roots and popularity, she was as much a Chicago blues artist as anyone in her day. Big Bill Broonzy recalls her beating both him and Tampa Red in a guitar contest and claims she was the best woman guitarist he had ever heard.”

Read more at Memphis Minnie | Biography & History | AllMusic

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Attribution for this was lost in the Tumblr import. If this is yours and you would like to be credited, please contact jaleesa@blackwomeninrock.info and let me know. Thanks!

#BlackWomenDidThat

thetrippytrip:

“The most disrespected person in America is a black woman… The most neglected person is a black woman…”

 

Despite this, you can see that many things were invented or created by black women. From civil right movement and fighting against any form of discrimination to the discovery of endless space there were people, about whom you won’t hear from TV (except cases when they need it) or you don’t hear/read at school (maybe 1-2 pages in a book). So here, some of huge amount of women, whose goal was something more than just being a woman.

Don’t forget that the first person to play the style that later became rock and roll was Sister Rosetta Tharpe! #BlackWomenDidThat

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

alwaysbewoke:

itwritteninblood:

munksrevolution:

hip-hop-zombie:

slxcc:

alwaysbewoke:

Black creative geniuses like Sister Rosetta Tharpe is why it hurts me that BLACK PEOPLE think Rock & Roll is “white people music.” We invented all of it. Rock & Roll is so Black that white people drained every drop of Blackness out of it and called what remained Metal. That’s how much Rock & Roll is Black music.

Don’t let white people and their “Elvis created Rock & Roll” nonsense fool you. Rock & Roll IS Black music. Even if it’s not your cup of tea, don’t deny or forget that it’s OURS.

I never knew this

even what is known as metal is derived from Jimi Hendrix

And punk is sourced from a band called Death, who existed 7 years prior to the Ramones

Can’t music just be everyone’s I listen to every type of music I don’t worry about what’s mine and what’s not mine it’s just music man.

In a perfect world, yes. However this is far from a perfect world and when the lie that is perpetuated about your people is that you have not contributed anything of value to this country or to society at large, it’s time to start GRABBING our credit from those who would belittle and erase us.

To quote the great Maya Angelou “I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands; you need to be able to throw something back.”

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

gotinterest:

alwaysbewoke:

itwritteninblood:

munksrevolution:

hip-hop-zombie:

slxcc:

alwaysbewoke:

Black creative geniuses like Sister Rosetta Tharpe is why it hurts me that BLACK PEOPLE think Rock & Roll is “white people music.” We invented all of it. Rock & Roll is so Black that white people drained every drop of Blackness out of it and called what remained Metal. That’s how much Rock & Roll is Black music.

Don’t let white people and their “Elvis created Rock & Roll” nonsense fool you. Rock & Roll IS Black music. Even if it’s not your cup of tea, don’t deny or forget that it’s OURS.

I never knew this

even what is known as metal is derived from Jimi Hendrix

And punk is sourced from a band called Death, who existed 7 years prior to the Ramones

Can’t music just be everyone’s I listen to every type of music I don’t worry about what’s mine and what’s not mine it’s just music man.

In a perfect world, yes. However this is far from a perfect world and when the lie that is perpetuated about your people is that you have not contributed anything of value to this country or to society at large, it’s time to start GRABBING our credit from those who would belittle and erase us.

To quote the great Maya Angelou “I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands; you need to be able to throw something back.”

The point was not that music can’t be for everyone, or listened to anyone. The point is that credit should go to where credit is due. The problem is that racism very often leads to white people stealing (whether intentionally or no) the credit for certain things from people of color. Were and are there quite a few influential and innovative white people in rock music? Yes, however, it is important to remember that they were not the ones who invented the genre in the first place, that they were and are merely building upon a black invention.

Tumblr Staff Black History Month roundup (featuring Black Women In Rock)


staff:

A little music to cap off your Black History Month. Enjoy.

Black Women in Rock (blackwomeninrock)
In classic rock, in modern rock, in genre-defying rock, in devastatingly gorgeous proto-rock. See Sister Rosetta Tharpe, above. Unreal.

Today in Hip Hop History (todayinhiphophistory)
“Mama Said Knock You Out” turned 24 yesterday. How you react to that will determine whether this blog is either your daily history lesson, or your daily wave of crushing nostalgia.

’70s Best Black Albums (70sbestblackalbums)
Still the most premium of decades.

Delta Blues, Folk, Gospel and More (deltabluesfolkgospelandmore)
Take a dip in these, the richest veins of American music. Track after track after track.

fyeahblackrockmusic (blackrockandrollmusic)
The nowest of this batch. Mostly videos. Completely vital.

Bonus:
Jagged Grain: Blues Archive (jaggedgrain)
This blog isn’t really kept up any more, but it’s still an incredible archive. You’re gonna see the best family jam session in history on the same page as Mance Lipscomb’s false teeth.

Just watch. This drummer:

Soooo staff mentioned my blog in a post you guys. Am I Tumblr famous now?

Edit: This was before I looked at my notifications lmao. Holy shit. Gonna get around to following all of you beautiful new followers as soon as I get home!

Black Women In Rock: If Sister Rosetta Tharpe is too old school for you, then maybe Santigold flips your wig. Either way, sisters have been part of rock music for as long as guitar feedback’s been loud

Forget what it sounds like for a minute, let’s consider the spirit of rock and roll: Rebellious. Energetic. Vocal. Independent. Driven. Unapologetic. Powerful. They’re characteristics I could attribute to damn-near every sister I know.
In fact, my personal Who’s Who of Rock and Roll is stacked with bomb Black women. Betty Davis. Grace Jones. Tina Turner. Aretha Franklin. Nona Hendryx. Poly Styrene. Joan Armatrading. Joyce Kennedy… and that’s just 1976-77.
So why do so many people go out of their way to marginalize or flat-out disregard Black women as both pioneers and torchbearers of rock? Why are we so indifferent to the fact that more than a few African-American women strapped an instrument to their back and helped carry the genre from the fields to the church to the juke joint to the charts to a multimillion-dollar industry?
Probably because someone told us it wasn’t ours and we chose to believe it. They said it was devil’s music, so we cast it out. We let it go because someone gave it white skin, a penis, and the green light to cross boundaries that Black people couldn’t. And in so doing, they convinced the world that our pioneers didn’t deserve equal recognition, equal exposure or equal ownership.
Damn shame.