Submissions•FIYAH Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction

Submissions•FIYAH Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction

Barbara Lynn, the Female Jimi Hendrix?

Barbara Lynn, the Female Jimi Hendrix?

A Style All Her Own: The Undefinable Cammie Gilbert

A Style All Her Own: The Undefinable Cammie Gilbert

Mother’s Finest to be honored: Atlanta band to be inducted into Georgia Music Hall of Fame

Mother’s Finest to be honored: Atlanta band to be inducted into Georgia Music Hall of Fame
blackrockandrollmusic:

“Weird For a Black Girl” – article by Jocelyn Michelle Brown

“We all know that racism and sexism are prevalent throughout the entertainment world, and can be found in any music scene. Further, there’s a significant amount of aggression brought into spaces where black women are making efforts to be seen and heard; this becomes more pronounced if any degree of weirdness or otherness is perceived. Contextually speaking, in situations where black male musicians have been championed for their weirdness (George Clinton, Jimi Hendrix, Bad Brains), black women have been dismissed out of hand as merely being strange (Grace Jones, Betty Davis)—no matter if our respective creative outputs hold the same weight, and no matter that we too bring the totality of who we are to the work that we do.

Today, women are having conversations with audiences that we haven’t been privy to before. Artists are lyrically and visually seeking inroads toward independence, agency, and their need to address current issues. We’re seeing greater numbers of female artists producing their own beats, writing their own songs, leading their own bands, and even pursuing new directions in terms of performing. Most importantly, these women are directly involved in processes that dictate how they and their work are consumed on a mass scale. Increasingly, the artists at the forefront of these changes are black women—and I’m here for it.”

— Joycelyn Michelle Brown, “Weird For a Black Girl”

“7 reasons why Black women can’t rock”

“SATE has expressed her frustration at being expected to sing soul, R&B, or jazz instead of rock music.  Other Black female rockers have also been told they don’t fit the bill because they “aren’t marketable” or because it was “too inappropriate.”

Yet Black women have been a part of the genre since the beginning, and many talented musicians have continued rocking out to this day.”

— Latonya Pennington, “7 reasons why Black women can’t rock”

Alternatives to Alternatives: The Black Grrrls Riot Ignored

Alternatives to Alternatives: The Black Grrrls Riot Ignored

Chatting with metal goddess Militia Vox

Chatting with metal goddess Militia Vox

Big Joanie on sistah punk, first times and their upcoming single

Big Joanie on sistah punk, first times and their upcoming single

“Givin Em What They Love”: Janelle Monáe and the Sonic Aesthetics of Black Womanhood

“Givin Em What They Love”: Janelle Monáe and the Sonic Aesthetics of Black Womanhood

Alabama Shakes’s Soul-Stirring, Shape-Shifting New Sound

Alabama Shakes’s Soul-Stirring, Shape-Shifting New Sound

Weird For a Black Girl: Changing indie culture when the mainstream won’t make room

Weird For a Black Girl: Changing indie culture when the mainstream won’t make room

The Power of Grace Jones

The Power of Grace Jones

Metal Divas Interview: Militia Vox

Metal Divas Interview: Militia Vox

Alabama Shakes Brittany Howard Releases New LP as Thunderbitch

Alabama Shakes Brittany Howard Releases New LP as Thunderbitch

For Objex lead singer Melanie Troxler, the future of punk is bright

For Objex lead singer Melanie Troxler, the future of punk is bright

Felony Melony: I’m here to start a revolution—a whole new rock revolution. I feel like Tina Turner, she did her thing and she’s still doing her thing and I look up to her a lot. I love her. She’s not punk, but she is rock n’ roll and rock n’ roll is forever. She’s been an inspiration to me my whole life, so I want to be the person to come out and break the mold. [Read More]

Afro-Punk Scene, Inspired By Santogold, TV On The Radio And More, Explodes Into A Multi-Genre Movement

Afro-Punk Scene, Inspired By Santogold, TV On The Radio And More, Explodes Into A Multi-Genre Movement